6 Types of Challenging Colleagues and how to handle them

Chances are that you will encounter challenging colleagues in the workplace. Learning early in your career to handle them will greatly help you. Your emotional intelligence will be enhanced and you will be able to reduce stress at work. Who are these challenging colleagues? The Teacher’s Pet It is natural for individuals to have a great rapport with each other. This situation may arise from shared work ethic,values,experiences and thought processes.  This can also occur when an employee fulfills a weakness in the manager or are able to make their manager look like a superstar. If someone has a great affiliation to their manager, it does not automatically mean trouble for you. Hopefully you will build on your own strengths to add value to your manager. In other words bloom in your own way and win kudos. It is only when the individual gets priority for all opportunities, gets preferential treatment or is excused for all bad behaviour, it becomes a problem. The first thing to remember is to be professional at all times. Never let your frustration show in your dealings with your colleague or your manager. Don’t let this conduct affect how you do your job. Make sure your job is done effectively and efficiently. Don’t gossip about the issue with others in the organisation. Speak to your boss about your own needs for growth and development. You will know how much they value you by the way they respond to this conversation. If there is a genuine intent to develop you, it is still a good place to work. You development is in your hands and...

How do you build trust during tough conversations?

I recently read an article by Georgia Murch titled Content and Intent is all you need.  I thought it was a great article that sets out the two essential ingredients that underpins effective feedback/communication. As this article outlines, the best feedback or communication occurs when we have properly structured content together with the right intent. Georgia points out that if you get it right, then you would be able to have a “remarkable conversation”. I believe there is a lot of material on how to give feedback. Most of us would have gone through a training program on the process of giving and receiving feedback.. Georgia’s article stimulated me to think about the intent piece of the puzzle which does not get the same exposure. Intent plays a big part in difficult conversations. If we do not get this right, trust and relationships can be damaged. We all know how hard it is to build trust and how easy it is to destroy it. It is best to find ways to ensure we approach the conversation with the right intent. I can safely say I have learnt these insights through some very painful experiences. How do we build trust during a tough conversation? Reflect if the feedback will benefit the individual Sit back and reflect on your motives. Individuals are not fools. They know straight up if you have a personal agenda in any feedback you give them. I recall having a conversation with a very angry young person. I was giving some feedback about his behaviours. I was in fact reinforcing what his manager had told him previously.Towards...