How to Decide Between Two Job Opportunities

“I love the job and what is involved, but they are expecting me to work after dinner, until late. I cannot do this, with my little one at home.” One of my friends told me this one day. She was so excited to have been asked for a second interview, as the job was what she was dreaming of doing for a while. It was a tough decision for her, but she had to put the interests of her family before her love for the job. “The job excites me, as it involves a new product launch and the people were so passionate. The only hitch: the package that is offered is lower than what I am on now. I simply cannot accept a drop in my salary with all my mortgage commitments and the kids just entering high school.” There was genuine regret in my neighbour’s voice when he told me about his latest job change attempt. Another tough decision, but my neighbour was happy with his decision of not accepting the job. As you can see, there are many reasons why people make the decisions that they do. It all depends on the criteria that will influence you at a given point in your life. How do you decide between two job opportunities or decide to quit your current job for another? It is best to be objective.This way, there is logic and reason backing up your decision. It is less stressful, and it is easier to explain your decision to yourself and to your family. Here’s the process: Write down the criteria that you will use...
What to consider when you look for that first real job?

What to consider when you look for that first real job?

Coming out of Tertiary Education and finding your first job is an important milestone for most of you. This lays the foundation for what you will do later in life and how much earning capacity you will have over the years. This is a critical decision. Another important decision you have already had to make is choosing the right course to attend in the university. Both have the power to influence which path your future travels. Taking the time to make these considered decisions will pay over time. Consider the following 6 items before you select those jobs to apply: What does the job actually do? Spend time doing your research. Great to find out “a day in the life of a ……………..” Hunt for people in your network who do these jobs and ask them what they do on a daily basis. Ask the question in professional forums or graduate forums to gain more insights. Gaining knowledge to help you make that informed decision is important. After spending a reasonable time studying you will know which subjects and skills are your strengths. If you are unsure, take your time to self-reflect. Which projects did you enjoy? Which subjects interested you? Which projects or exams gave you the highest marks? Which was the most fun? Once you have answered all these questions, you will have an idea which areas you would like to spend a good part of your future in. Don’t do what I did by falling into a profession because the options were limited. It takes longer to figure out what you want to do in life....
Questions to ask yourself when you are restless in a job

Questions to ask yourself when you are restless in a job

“I am moving to another job as my manager wants me to do repetitive work, but I would like to learn fast and move on to new things.” “I don’t want to work on boring things. Why can’t I do a project as well? ” These comments from the young and the restless are pretty common in workplaces. “I cannot give Jane any new tasks, as she does not pay attention to detail and makes lots of mistakes for the tasks she is currently responsible.” “Peter does not want to learn the technicalities of the role. He just wants to attend all the meetings and put forward his opinion.” These comments are common from managers in organisations. What is the real situation? From my experience we have the following combinations: A. Bright young person with a manager who does not want to change status quo or spend the time developing people = Frustrated young person. B. Bright young person in a flat structure where development opportunities are limited = Resigned young person until they leave the organisation. C. Restless young person without an eye for detail and a manager who is faced with repeated mistakes = Frustrated manager. D. A young person who thinks they know everything when they learn the basics of the job = A person who cannot get a promotion. When you find yourself restless and wanting to move, it is best to self-reflect and be honest with yourself before you find that next job. If there is an underlying issue, it is best to fix that before you move. This way, the restlessness will not...
5 Things that will help you get your first “right” Job.

5 Things that will help you get your first “right” Job.

“I told my son to get his resume professionally done. I don’t think he knows what to do with something like a resume. I am worried he will not find a job any time before Christmas”. This was what a worried mother told me a couple of months ago. An increasing number of university graduates are living with their parents while completing their studies and some continue to do so well into their first job. While it works better for the graduates on the financial front, there is more tension in relationships at home as the parents expect outcomes which may not be aligned with their children. I followed the purposeful mother as we went in search of her hapless son. The poor fellow just grunted while his mother gave me a ten minute description of how he had no idea about resume and applications. I waited until his mum had subsided and asked the son his opinion of the situation. “Well,” he said meekly, “I only applied for a couple of internships last year and was called to one interview. The interview did not go for very long. I didn’t get the internship. Now I am concentrating on finishing my course by July. I am sure I will get something. Not sure why mum’s so concerned”. “Did you prepare for the interview?” I asked him. “Not really,” came the answer. “I thought it would be pretty straight forward as it was an unpaid internship”. I am sure many such conversations are taking place around the country. You approach your first work experience thinking that it will be an...